Workshops

5 quick ways of improving your user stories

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Gojko Adzic.

Location: Sydneshaugen
Starts at: Thursday 09:00

Many teams now have reasonably good tech practices, but things coming into their work stream were not defined well, not split well, not valuable enough in isolation, and generally not the kind of user stories that give people the big benefits that they expect. Join this workshop to try out a few small changes to the way you can manage user stories, which will make a huge impact on the actual outcomes of your software delivery.

Primarily for: Developers, Tester/test leads, Project managers, Architects, UX specialists, Security professionals, Product developers, Managers
Participant requirements: No computer necessary

Avoid Scrum Failure: How to Work with Scrum Culture

Short workshop - Hosted by Ivana Gancheva.

Location: Teatergaten
Starts at: Friday 13:30

Did you ever feel your improvement efforts got blocked? Sensed you were hitting an invisible wall?

Culture is this elusive thing that is quite hard to define. Learn to make sense of it and how to hack and influence the culture of your organisation.

In this hands-on workshop you will learn to see Scrum as a culture system and develop a collection of experiments to work more effectively at your organization.

You will work with the culture, not against or around it, so that it can't hit you from the back.

 

This workshop was co-developed with Olaf Lewitz, trust artist, and Michael Sahota, agile expert on enterprise culture, and author of "An Agile Adoption and Transformation Survival Guide".

 

Primarily for: Developers, Tester/test leads, Project managers, Architects, UX specialists, Security professionals, Product developers, Managers, Scrum masters, Agile coaches, Designers, Others
Participant requirements: Experiences from their organisations and career history. Openness for interesting conversations. Curiosity.

Bug Parades, Zombies, and the BSIMM: A Decade of Software Security

Keynote - Hosted by Gary McGraw.

Location: Dragefjellet
Starts at: Wednesday 09:15

Only ten years ago, the idea of building security in was brand new.  Back
then, if system architects and developers thought about security at all,
they usually concentrated on the liberal application of magic crypto fairy
dust.  We have come a long way since then.  Perhaps no segment of the
security industry has evolved more in the last decade than the discipline
of software security.  Several things happened in the early part of the
decade that set in motion a major shift in the way people build software:
the release of my book Building Secure Software, the publication of Bill
Gates's Trustworthy Computing memo, the publication of Lipner and Howard¹s
Writing Secure Code, and a wave of high-profile attacks such as Code Red
and Nimda that forced Microsoft, and ultimately other large software
companies, to get religion about software security.  Now, ten years later,
Microsoft has made great strides in software security and building
security in---and they¹re publishing their ideas in the form of the SDL.
Right about in the middle of the last ten years (five years in) we all
collectively realized that the way to approach software security was to
integrate security practices that I term the "Touchpoints" into the
software development lifecycle.  Now, at the end of a decade of great
progress in software security, we have a way of measuring software
security initiatives called the BSIMM <http://bsimm.com>.  BSIMM is
helping transform the field from an art into a measurable science.  This
talk provides an entertaining review of the software security journey from
its "bug of the day" beginnings to the multi-million dollar software
security initiatives of today.

Primarily for: Security professionals
Participant requirements:

Bug Parades, Zombies, and the BSIMM: A Decade of Software Security (extended dance version)

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Gary McGraw.

Location: Dragefjellet
Starts at: Thursday 09:00

Only ten years ago, the idea of building security in was brand new.  Back
then, if system architects and developers thought about security at all,
they usually concentrated on the liberal application of magic crypto fairy
dust.  We have come a long way since then.  Perhaps no segment of the
security industry has evolved more in the last decade than the discipline
of software security.  Several things happened in the early part of the
decade that set in motion a major shift in the way people build software:
the release of my book Building Secure Software, the publication of Bill
Gates's Trustworthy Computing memo, the publication of Lipner and Howard¹s
Writing Secure Code, and a wave of high-profile attacks such as Code Red
and Nimda that forced Microsoft, and ultimately other large software
companies, to get religion about software security.  Now, ten years later,
Microsoft has made great strides in software security and building
security in---and they¹re publishing their ideas in the form of the SDL.
Right about in the middle of the last ten years (five years in) we all
collectively realized that the way to approach software security was to
integrate security practices that I term the "Touchpoints" into the
software development lifecycle.  Now, at the end of a decade of great
progress in software security, we have a way of measuring software
security initiatives called the BSIMM <http://bsimm.com>.

Using the framework described in my book ³Software Security: Building
Security In² I will discuss and describe the state of the practice in
software security.  This tutorial is peppered with real data from the
field, based on my work with several large companies as a Cigital
consultant.  As a discipline, software security has made great progress
over the last decade.  Of the many large-scale software security
initiatives we are aware of, sixty-seven---all household names---are
currently included in the BSIMM study. Those companies among the
sixty-seven who graciously agreed to be identified include: Adobe, Aetna,
Bank of America, Box, Capital One, Comerica Bank, EMC, Epsilon, F-Secure,
Fannie Mae, Fidelity, Goldman Sachs, HSBC, Intel, Intuit, JPMorgan Chase &
Co., Lender Processing Services Inc., Marks and Spencer, Mashery, McAfee,
McKesson, Microsoft, NetSuite, Neustar, Nokia, Nokia Siemens Networks,
PayPal, Pearson Learning Technologies, QUALCOMM, Rackspace, Salesforce,
Sallie Mae, SAP, Sony Mobile, Standard Life, SWIFT, Symantec, Telecom
Italia, Thomson Reuters, TomTom, Vanguard, Visa, VMware, Wells Fargo, and
Zynga.   The BSIMM was created by observing and analyzing real-world data
from leading software security initiatives. The BSIMM can help you
determine how your organization compares to other real software security
initiatives and what steps can be taken to make your approach more
effective.  BSIMM is helping transform the field from an art into a
measurable science.

This tutorial provides an entertaining review of the software security
journey from its "bug of the day" beginnings to the multi-million dollar
software security initiatives of today.

 

Primarily for: Developers, Architects, Security professionals
Participant requirements:

Changing your testing mindset

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Lisa Crispin.

Location: Tårnplass
Starts at: Thursday 09:00

In many "traditional" software develpoment organizations, testers are on separate teams, and testing comes "after". This is all different with agile (or what Lisa likes to simply call "good software development"). Everyone on the team should be involved with testing activities and take responsibility for quality. It takes a mindset shift for everyone, including the testers. The focus shifts from finding defects after coding to preventing defects from getting into the code in the first place. Our job is more than taking customer requirements and turning them into code - we need to help customers identify the most valuable features to deliver and implement those as simply as possible. 

In this workshop we'll discuss patterns and practices that  help everyone change how they think about testing. Participants will get a chance to try out some techniques that help us build the right software for our customers, and adopt a whole-team approach to testing and quality.  

This session is for anyone with an interest in improving software quality and delighting their customers. At least a beginner-level knowledge of agile is required.

Primarily for: Developers, Tester/test leads, Project managers
Participant requirements:

Clojure 101

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Rob Ashton.

Location: Muséplass
Starts at: Thursday 09:00

TBA

Primarily for: Developers, Architects
Participant requirements:

Conversational Patterns in Behavior-Driven Development

Short workshop - Hosted by Liz Keogh.

Location: Sydneshaugen
Starts at: Wednesday 15:15

BDD is the art of using examples in conversation to illustrate the behaviour of systems. More recently, a slew of different tools have become the focus for BDD, putting the emphasis on automation. In this workshop we bring it back to its origins, looking at simple patterns which can be used to create great examples, come up with more examples, and question our existing knowledge and wisdom. We'll also take a brief look at Cynefin, and see why high levels of certainty and uncertainty might cause BDD to break, how to spot it, and what to do about it when it does!

 

Primarily for: Developers, Tester/test leads, Project managers, Architects, UX specialists, Product developers
Participant requirements:

Courage and being brave, an exploration of being you

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Torbjörn Gyllebring, Gitte Klitgaard.

Location: Tårnplass
Starts at: Wednesday 13:30

Being brave is not about removing fear or not being afraid – it is about doing what is necessary even when you are afraid.

Torbjörn and Gitte have explored this area for several years.

For us courage is very much about being who you are.

Participants will learn to understand what courage is. They'll discover their own capacity for it and learn tactics to be more courageous

Thus becoing more effective with their team, customer and other relationships.

This we accomplish by sharing our experience and through exercises that will draw out the participants unique potential for courage.

Primarily for: Developers, Tester/test leads, Project managers, Architects, UX specialists, Security professionals, Product developers
Participant requirements:

CQRS and Event Sourcing

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Greg Young.

Location: Sydneshaugen
Starts at: Friday 09:00

TBA

Primarily for: Developers, Architects
Participant requirements:

First Takes All programming workshop/game

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Anders Karlsen.

Location: Strangehagen
Starts at: Friday 09:00

"First takes all" is a programming workshop (and game) inspired by the "Extreme startup" workshop. One can work alone or in teams. Each participant (or team) is given a long list of programming tasks to complete. The problems have different difficulty levels, so the more complex tasks will give more points.

You read the the questions by making a http get request to a game server. You answer by sending a http post to the same server. Because of this you can use whatever programming language you want. Starting points will be provided in (a least) Java, C#, Clojure, Ruby, Python and JavaScript (node.js).

As a player you must decide what tasks to solve in order to maximize your points.

The workshop is designed to be a fun exercise where you must write correct code as fast as possible.

 

Primarily for:
Participant requirements: PC with IDE with their preferred programming language.

Great Architecture is Child's Play

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Jim "Cope" Coplien.

Location: Dragefjellet
Starts at: Wednesday 13:30

Agile Architecture is for children: Playful, active, spontaneous. Much of the agile vision was present in Alan Kay's 1970s vision of his Dynabooks as network-connected extensions of the minds of children who were learning how to program. It's a vision that links people to their machines and to the process of learning together, based on Piaget's models of childhood learning. Later, objects' newly heralded facilities for software maintenance, together with the rise in personal computers, fuelled the iterative development spirit that lies at the heart of agile development. At the same time objects also became the focus of how to give software the kind of flexibility that an agile process could take advantage of. However, it's important to remember that the founders of Agile were 50s-something-year-olds, and adults tend to confuse architecture with engineering. Their architectures honour business goals with utilitas, and engineering mandates with firmitas. We should return the kind of spontaneity and action to architecture that we see in children's wood block creations — the venustas of architecture, and the giggling glee of having created something good. A great architecture "supports what happens there" and connects to human emotion in the same sense that a great mosque can inspire. The keys to child-like design lie in placing human mental models first where focus on living events among the pillars has more significance than the pillars themselves.

Primarily for: Developers, Tester/test leads, Project managers, Architects, UX specialists, Security professionals, Product developers
Participant requirements:

How to build the right thing - Business Impact Mapping and Management

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Johan Berndtsson, Ingrid Domingues.

Location: Teatergaten
Starts at: Friday 09:00

Although User Experience has been on everybody's lips the last years, and although agile has become the way of managing projects, the web- and IT communities are still building solutions that do not deliver value to users and business.

The main reason for this is that the transition from requirements to design is left as a black hole in existing methods for project management and development processes. The solution is Business Impact Management, whereas the expected business and user values becomes the compass for all design and management work in any digital design and build process.

Primarily for: Tester/test leads, Project managers, UX specialists, Product developers
Participant requirements:

How to not just survive but thrive with flexible scope

Keynote - Hosted by Gojko Adzic.

Location: Dragefjellet
Starts at: Friday 15:15

Not fixing scope too far in the future is one of the cornerstones of agile delivery, but it is at the same time the thing that enterprise stakeholders fear the most. Ironically, being able to change decisions after delivery starts is one of the biggest benefits that companies can get from agile delivery, so it's necessary to stop worrying and embrace flexible scope to get the full benefits of an iterative process. In this talk, Gojko Adzic will show you how to convince people to embrace flexible scope, not only for startup environments but for big enterprise projects as well.

Primarily for: Developers, Tester/test leads, Project managers, Architects, UX specialists, Security professionals, Product developers
Participant requirements:

Informed Gamification - How to spread the pixie dust

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Linn Sovig, Ricki Sickenger.

Location: Galgebakken
Starts at: Friday 09:00

In this workshop we will look at what gamification is, how it relates to traditional game design, and how gamification can make your products more successful.

Gamification is the use of game elements and game mechanics in non-game contexts. Gamification can help you increase user engagement, help users make better decisions, and keep them coming back. Whether you are creating public facing web sites or internal applications, gamification can be the pixie dust that makes your product a super fantastic experience!

At least in theory.

A lot of developers add gamification to their product with ho hum and google-search-infused randomness on top of a product that wasn’t designed to be gamified. This is a sure-fire way to make gamification fail.

We will introduce a methodology that will allow you to make informed decisions about how you want to your gamification to work. We will discuss the methodology and teach you how to analyze existing products.

At the end of the workshop you will have a clear understanding of what gamification is, when and how it should be used, and be able to design and analyze gamified applications.

Speakers:

Ricki Sickenger is a former game industry professional with 10 years experience working on a large scale massive multiplayer game called Darkfall. He now works as an IT consultant and moonlights as an indie game developer. His main passions are development methodologies, game development and gamification.

Linn Søvig has worked with social media and other interactive platforms for 8 years. She has a particular interest in computer games and is currently project manager for building a game development center in Norway.

Primarily for: Developers, Project managers, Architects, UX specialists, Product developers, Managers
Participant requirements:

Introduction to Cynefin

Short workshop - Hosted by Liz Keogh.

Location: Sydneshaugen
Starts at: Wednesday 13:30

Cynefin is a framework for helping us make sense of our world, the order and chaos within it, and the complications and complexities that result. In this workshop we'll look at the implications of certainty and uncertainty within our work and our lives, and consider the approach to solving problems in different domains: in simplicity, where problems are well-understood; in the complicated domain where expertise is required; in the complex domain where cause and effect are only correlated in retrospect and outcomes emerge; and in chaos, where command-and-control may be the best thing! We'll also take a look at disorder, in which we often apply the wrong approach, and consider how many of our existing development practices may actually lie in that place...

Primarily for: Developers, Tester/test leads, Project managers, Architects, UX specialists, Product developers
Participant requirements:

Leading teams in the Age of Agile

Full-day workshop - Hosted by Elad Sofer.

Location: Tårnplass
Starts at: Friday 09:00

This may come as a surprise to some of us, but most modern studies and experience shows that in a "thinking based industry" such as IT, we cannot simply tell people what to do and expect them to do so. Damn!

This may actually require us to display leadership qualities. Double Damn!

But fear not. While many think that leadership is something that you are either born with or not, it is not the case.

In this workshop we shall learn and experiment with different practical leadership models and tools that you will be able to use the next day.

We shall touch on topics such as self organization, feedback giving and receiving, situational leadership and conflict

 

Primarily for: Developers, Tester/test leads, Project managers
Participant requirements: Nothing

Learn how to utilise a graph database with Neo4j

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Andreas Heim, Ole-Martin Mørk.

Location: Strangehagen
Starts at: Friday 13:30

In this 1,5 hour workshop you will learn how to work with Neo4j, the leading graph database on the Java platform. The workshop will be composed of a series of lectures, each followed by a set of TDD-style assignments.

You will learn about data modeling, querying and writing to a graph database. Our focus will be the database and the CYPHER query-language, not ORMs or boilerplate code. This makes it easier for you to understand the core concepts of Neo4j.

After the workshop the attendees will have a clear understanding of what a graph database is, how to work with it and when to use it.

The participants will need to bring their own laptop with Java preinstalled. The courseware will be published on github after the workshop. 

Presenters

Ole-Martin Mørk is a Scientist at BEKK Consulting AS in Oslo, Norway. His role in the company is to focus especially on emerging technologies and spread joy and excitement over new technologies and its possibilities. He graduated in 2000 with a Bachelor in Computer Science from Østfold College.

Ole-Martin often speaks at conferences in Norway and Sweden, like JavaZone, Software and JFokus. He is also involved in different user groups like Oslo XP and javaBin. Se more of Ole-Martin Mørk here: http://www.slideshare.net/olemartinmork/presentations and http://github.com/olemartin

 

Andreas Heim is Practice Lead for the NoSQL & Big Data group, also at BEKK Consulting. He graduated from Oslo University College with a Bachelor in 2008, but has been working in the IT-industry since the first dot com boom in 2000. Andreas only communicates with his surroundings through his github account: github.com/heim, but he has been observed talking at a handful conferences in the last couple of years. 

 

Primarily for: Developers, Architects
Participant requirements: A laptop with Maven and Java installed, and intermediate Java-programming skills.

Let’s be evil! and get away with it - “let us play with dark patterns”

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Fredrik Johnsson.

Location: Muséplass
Starts at: Wednesday 13:30

In this workshop you will work with and implement designs which are beneficial for a made up organisation, where the goal is to incorporate dark patterns and design in such a way that the user will not be aware of the evil being done.

With reference from some real sites out there we will set up some "goals" the organisation desires to be met and you will design it. 

This will give you the knowledge to do evil, but primarily it will give you the tools to reject such ideas before the make it into a real project.

Primarily for:
Participant requirements: An open mind.

Map/Reduce with R, Hadoop and AWS

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Siv Midtun Hollup, Anette Bergo.

Location: Hødden
Starts at: Wednesday 13:30

Come along to get up and running with your first Map/Reduce job in R, and learn about a language that is elegant, complicated and just plain strange all at once. Unless you happen to have a degree in statistics, in which case everything will make sense. Once up and running with a simple example we will build on that to do more advanced analysis of a larger data sets, in order to gain some valuable insight.

You will learn the basics of R, and how to emulate a map/reduce job locally in order to set up and debug it. You will learn how to run a map/reduce job via the amazon console, for both a scripted and a packaged version of R, and you will also learn how to bootstrap your cluster to make sure it is has the packages and tools you need.

Primarily for: Developers, Architects
Participant requirements: You will need to bring a computer. To get up and running fast, you should preferably pre-install R and RStudio. You should also have set up an Amazon AWS account beforehand. Note that we will be running on paid instances, and your creditcard will be charged a few dollars for the session.

MicroServices: Let's Build Some!

Full-day workshop - Hosted by Fred George.

Location: Hødden
Starts at: Friday 09:00

In this workshop, we will start with a pre-built skeleton micro-service environment (message bus plus a couple of RESTful services running against it). We will then design and implement additional services to broaden the overall functionality. These additional services can be written in any language that will run on the participants laptop. While pairing is strongly encouraged, it is not required.

The focus of the workshop will be on:

This session can accommodate up to 30 participants with pairing. If more participants are desired, in-room coach will need to be added, and may be feasible with sufficient notice.

Primarily for: Developers, Architects, Product developers
Participant requirements: Notebook with Wifi, already fitted with development tools for the language of their choice.

Mutation Testing with PIT

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Filip van Laenen.

Location: Strangehagen
Starts at: Thursday 09:00

Create some mutants and see whether any of them can pass the gates – it sounds like the start of a bad B movie. But in reality, it's a good description of how mutation testing works. It makes changes to the source code (the “mutants”), and then checks whether your unit tests (the “gates”) can detect and stop them.

Code coverage only tells you which lines of code aren't touched by unit tests. Mutation testing is a much more powerfull technique, which can reveal whether there are unit tests testing the wrong thing, whether there are some missing, or whether your system contains unnecessary code. And, unlike code coverage, it can't be gamed: simply having a unit test running through the code isn't enough, the mutant has to be killed to pass the mutation test.

During this workshop, you'll be introduced to what mutation testing is about, how it works, and how you can use it in a project. We'll set up a small Java project and work through an example to see the mutation testing tool PIT in action. After that, the participants can continue to work on the sample project learning to deal with mutations that won't go away, and how the PIT reports can be used to find the missing unit tests.

 

Primarily for: Developers, Architects
Participant requirements: A laptop with Java and Maven installed, and an IDE.

Node.JS and React: Party in the front, party in the back

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Christian Johansen.

Location: Muséplass
Starts at: Friday 09:00

Curious about the Node.JS hype? This 3 hour workshop will give you a practical introduction. We'll look into the essential aspects of working with Node: core concepts such as events, buffers and streams, asynchronous APIs for working with the file system and creating web servers, as well as developer tools like the npm package manager and automated testing. There will also be a brief introduction to React, the ui component library of tomorrow (and today), and how we can take advantage of being able to use the same libraries on both the backend and the frontend.

Primarily for: Developers, Architects, UX specialists
Participant requirements: Laptop with Node.js installed

Practice effective programming with coding dojo

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Johannes Brodwall.

Location: Teatergaten
Starts at: Wednesday 13:30

A Coding Dojo is a fun and social way to become a better programmer. Johannes is an experienced coding coach who will guide you through a few hours of programming that will transform your understand your craft and yourself as a programmer. In the workshop you get to try out pair programming, test-driven development and continuous refactoring for yourself and you get lots of recommendations on how to improve your coding and testing. You will need to bring your own computer with a development environment of your choice. Recommended for Java, Ruby, JavaScript and C# developers.

This is what previous participants say about the workshop:

Primarily for: Developers
Participant requirements: Laptop with their favorite development environment

Puppet and Vagrant workshop

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Stian Mathiassen, Sveinung Dalatun.

Location: Galgebakken
Starts at: Thursday 09:00

Vagrant is a tool for creating and configuring virtualized environments. To set up these environments with users, configuration and services we will use the provisioning framework Puppet. Puppet lets you write your infrastructure as code. This way you can treat your infrastructure as you would any other pieces of code: Put it in version control, make it reproducable, and make it maintainable.

The workshop will have a little theory introducing the various concepts to get you started, and a lot of assignments that most would find relevant to their own projects.

The presentation and assignments can be found at https://github.com/bekkopen/devops-kurs

Please install the software required before the workshop. Installation instructions can be found here: https://github.com/bekkopen/devops-kurs/blob/master/README.md

Primarily for: Developers, Architects, Others
Participant requirements: Mac/PC

React - Fast, smart, structured UI components

Short workshop - Hosted by David Ed Mellum.

Location: Muséplass
Starts at: Friday 13:30

With tools like Backbone and Angular it's easier than ever to build well-structured, complicated web apps that are slow and janky. Careful batching of DOM operations and optimizing or plain removing data bindings will speed things up, but what if we could get that speed without additional work?

React is here! It abstracts away the slow, often cumbersome DOM with a fast and simple virtual DOM in pure Javascript. Add an efficient, tunable diff algorithm and suddenly building lightning fast UIs becomes a piece of cake. React's simple one-way reactive data updates makes updating UI significantly more predictable than traditional data binding. DOM events are also optimized by default, being automatically delegated by React.

To get a hang of React and build some experience we'll be building practical components based on failing test-suites and ensure that they indeed are fast and jank-free.

Primarily for: Developers, UX specialists
Participant requirements: A machine ready for front-end development with Git installed.

Responsible with Ansible

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Stein Inge Morisbak.

Location: Galgebakken
Starts at: Wednesday 13:30

Ansible is a radically simple and lightweight provisioning framework which makes your servers and applications easier to provision and deploy. It uses a language that approaches plain English, uses SSH and has no agents to install on remote systems. Ansible is the simplest way to automate and orchestrate application deployment, configuration management and continuous delivery.

In this workshop you will be given an introduction to Ansible. We will get some hands-on experience in provisioning Linux servers with a web-proxy, a database and some other packages. Furthermore we will automate zero-downtime deployment of a Java application.

Please install the following before the workshop:

Install VirtualBox: https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads
Install Vagrant: http://docs.vagrantup.com/v2/installation/

Install Python setuptools: https://pypi.python.org/pypi/setuptools#installation-instructions
sudo easy_install pip
sudo pip install paramiko PyYAML jinja2 passlib
sudo pip install ansible --quiet

Primarily for: Developers, Architects
Participant requirements: Their own machine. Preferably Linux or Mac with the above mentioned software installed. I cannot guarantee that it will work on Windows.

Superheroic web development with AngularJS

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Espen Fossen, Eirik Bjørsnøs.

Location: Teatergaten
Starts at: Thursday 09:00

Did you your last Javascript project turn into an unmaintainable, undebuggable rabbit hole of event handlers calling event handlers using JQuery selectors leading absolutely nowhere?

Trust us, we feel your pain. But seriously, get your act together: Start learning AngularJS!

Angular takes the pain out of front-end development. Automatic two-way binding between your UI components and models makes a whole class of bug-ridden, stinky state juggling code evaporate. Services and Dependency Injection keeps your code modular, testable and organizable. Directives and filters ensures your HTML is expressive and readable.
 
This workshop teaches you everything you need to get productive with Angular. Starting with an introduction to the framework’s core concepts, we’ll quickly get our feet wet solving real world problems using Angular. Bring your laptop and join us!

Please install the following before the workshop:

Install Java: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/jdk7-downloads-1880260.html
Install Maven: http://maven.apache.org/download.cgi

 

Primarily for: Developers, UX specialists, Product developers
Participant requirements: Bring a laptop with a modern browser and a Javascript / HTML text editor.

Threat modelling

Short workshop - Hosted by Vidar Drageide.

Location: Galgebakken
Starts at: Friday 13:30

There is a lot to think about when it comes to IT-security, how, when, why how much etc. In this short workshop we will talk about Microsofts Threat modelling tool and how to use it as part of your security architecture for that new shiny application of yours. The presenter will present a simple web-application which the participants then will make a threat model of. 

Threat modelling is another good practice for modelling your application and identifying the most common threats towards your application using Microsofts STRIDE(Spoofing, tampering, repudiation, information disclosure, denial-of-service and elevation of privilege) framework. Using this method you will quickly be able to model your application and determine which standard information security safeguards you need to build into your application ( That’s right build into, not add on top of).

This short workshop will focus on threat modelling as described in Microsoft SDL and will start by a (super)quick outline of the (M)SDL and the STRIDE-framework, then go on to introducing threat modelling as a simple and efficient way to identify those important security features. Microsofts SDL Threrat modelling tool will be introduced and demonstrated. 

We will go on to demonstrate a simple web-application that everyone should try to model and the workshop will be summarized by a discussion of how the emerging threat model should be used and how to evaluate and mitigate the identified threats. 

If you want to use the Microsoft tool Visio 2010 is a pre-requisite. But drawing threat models can be done without any tools

 

 

Primarily for: Developers, Architects, Security professionals, Product developers
Participant requirements: Computer with drawing program is sufficient. If you want to follow the presenter bring a computer with a Windows installation and Visio 2011.

Why Multitasking Suck and What We Can Do About That

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Pawel Brodzinski.

Location: Hødden
Starts at: Thursday 09:00

Multitasking doesn’t come for free. There is little arguing over that. At the same time, when we look carefully on how we do work, we see how insanely common multitasking and context switching are. Does it mean that we are inefficient? You bet. Why don’t we do anything about that then? Well, that’s a good question.

Let’s equip ourselves with tools that not only address the question but also enable the change of the status quo.

We will start with discussing the cost of context switching. We will cover bits of theory that help to understand how multitasking affects productivity and quality of our work. We will scratch the surface of queuing theory, cost of delay and theory of constraints to learn how comprehensively covered is the multitasking issue. We will discuss why, despite having so much evidence in place, organizations still focus on optimizing people utilization and introduce extensive amounts of work in progress. Finally, we will look for solutions to address the issue of inefficiency imposed by heavy multitasking.

The workshop will be anything by a dry lecture though. We will run a set of simulations that will show:

At the end of the workshop you will understand how optimizing people utilization and lack of understanding how the work gets done fuel extensive multitasking. You will know how to address this issue and how to measure the change. You will be well-equipped to challenge how the work gets done.

Primarily for: Developers, Tester/test leads, Project managers, Architects, UX specialists, Security professionals, Product developers
Participant requirements:

Write your first automated test TODAY

Half-day workshop - Hosted by Janicke Eilertsen.

Location: Strangehagen
Starts at: Wednesday 13:30

Hands-on workshop on setting up, writing and running your first automated test - strictly for non-developers!

My experience with test automation in different projects has taught me that it is easy to automate tests; it is dealing with people and organizations that is the most challenging. In this workshop, strictly for non-developers, we will focus on the easy bit; we will set up and run our first automated test today, using open-source software.

My goal is that by the end of the day you have run your first automated test, and when you get back to work you can easily tweak the test to log on and check the application you work with every day. Please bring a friend (you will mostly work in pairs), a windows 7 laptop and some patience, so we can get started.

Timetable

Part one: Why non-developers need to be able to automate tests

Part two: How does automation actually work

Part tree: Test automation through the GUI

Round up: Where do we go from here?

Primarily for: Tester/test leads, Project managers, Product developers
Participant requirements: Windows 7 laptop